Archive for category Training Effectiveness

Death to Learning & Development! Fact or Fiction?

revolutionIs workplace learning and development (L&D) dying? Does it deserve to continue to exist? What should L&D become to survive? These are some of the questions people have recently been asking. My friend and colleague, Tom Spiglanin, just blogged about a significant change in the workplace learning space. Tom knows his stuff and I encourage you to read his post, “It’s Happening” first before reading this. But also, Tom (and me too) is open to discussion so please share your opinions. Read the rest of this entry »

5 Comments

Trends, Goals, and Professional Development….Planning for 2016

The 35th anniversary of John Lennon’s death just passed but his word remain…“So this is Christmas, and what have you done? Another year over. And a new one just begun.”

Yes. Another year is over and what have you done? If you are unable to fully answer this question don’t worry, you are not alone. The end of a year comes upon us quickly and it is often difficult to reconcile considering the promise a start of the year offers.

Read the rest of this entry »

Leave a comment

The Real Business of Learning Evaluation

Thank you to Con Sotidis (@LearnKotch) and #OzLearn for inviting me to be part of their upcoming Nov 10, 2015 (8pm AEDT) Twitter Chat. I wish my L&D colleagues ‘down unda’ learn as much from my perspective as I expect to discover from them.

boss-hidingBusiness leaders place Learning practitioners under tremendous pressure to demonstrate that their learning efforts are worth the budget they allocate. This is probably one of the biggest challenges facing those involved with any aspect of workplace learning.

There are many reasons why learning practitioners are unable to connect their efforts with actual workplace applications. One that stands out is that learning practitioners focus on the “learning” rather than on how learning impacts business performance.

Read the rest of this entry »

1 Comment

Don’t Drink the Learning Evaluation Kool-Aid!

knowledge-retention

Learning practitioners are taught early, or should I dare say brainwashed, to believe the ‘essential’ four levels of evaluation. Many of us refer to these levels as the Kirkpatrick’s Evaluation Model and it has been a cornerstone in every learning event and also a foundation for many evaluation models that followed.

But let’s be honest, the unspoken truth is that the Kirkpatrick model is flawed. Yes, I dare say it out loud and may the learning gods, and some of my peers, strike me down. While you pick you jaw off the floor, the fact is that the evaluation method has some apparent issues. Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Comments

It’s Not About ‘Learning’…It’s About Business Accountability!

3monkeysBusiness leaders place Learning practitioners under tremendous pressure to demonstrate that their learning efforts and initiatives are worth the budget they allocate to it. This is probably one of the biggest challenges facing those involved with any aspect of workplace learning.

There are many reasons why learning practitioners are unable to connect their efforts with actual workplace applications. One that stands out is that learning practitioners tend to focus on the “learning” rather than on how learning results impact business performance. Workplace learning likes to talk about being ‘accountable’ but behind the talk is an unfortunate reality where, like the three monkeys, the belief still exists that it will go away if we do not speak, see, or hear it. Read the rest of this entry »

2 Comments

‘Snake Oil’ From the Bully Pulpit

bullying2Recently, a well-respected workplace learning peer posted an interesting and conversation-inducing discussion about dealing with a ‘snake oil’ person within your personal learning network (PLN).

Personally, I found this blog post very insightful. I respect the message the post is attempting to communicate but a thought crossed my mind, “How prevalent is the issue of having a ‘snake-oil’ person in a PLN  become?” It doesn’t seem to be a significant issue within my PLNs.

Since it is not an issue for me, I reflected on how would I define a ‘snake oil’ person within my PLNs? And, do they exist in my PLN or other learning environments I participate?

Read the rest of this entry »

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

2 Comments

Slaying the “Elephant” in the Training Room

Stop Wasting Your Organization’s Money If You’re Not Delivering Learning

ElephantThe past few months have been a whirlwind for us speaking at one conference after another….and it’s starting again. It is truly a privilege to speak at these excellent learning and performance conferences. What is disappointing, however, is the lack of learning that actually takes place both from the participants and from the many conference speakers.

Yes, we want to address the “elephant in the training room”. We’re going to state what many Learning professionals and leaders are thinking (and afraid to say aloud). From our vantage point as conference speakers’ there are two significant concerns. First, participants look as if they are always seeking a “quick fix” rather than a sustainable solution. This is very disconcerting since workplace learning efforts are a process not a “fix”. Read the rest of this entry »

4 Comments

Time to Get Real About Workplace Learning!

(Originally published on ASTD Links March 4th, 2014 http://bit.ly/1gIJFJL)

After circulating the conference circuit in the past few months, we’ve been dismayed to see that many learning professionals believe learning’s role can, and possibly should, remain disconnected to from business reality. By no means do we want to minimize some of the worthy learning integration efforts many forward-thinking organizations initiate. But the fact remains that too many learning leaders and teams show disdain about recognizing workplace learning in a business context. Furthermore, they refuse to comply with their organization’s business reality. Instead, some professionals believe that learning is a noble effort, an attitude we find to be a bit arrogant. Often, these are the same people who are waiting for a quick fix that will gain their business leaders’ acceptance and make their learning efforts relevant. Read the rest of this entry »

Leave a comment

Get on the RADAR! Gaining Buy-in for E/M-Learning

The challenge for many workplace learning professionals is their ability, or more the inability, to get their leadership to recognize the importance and relevance of significant learning initiatives. If you are frustrated not gaining the attention you believe your initiatives deserve you are not alone. Through this tip, you will get on, what I refer to, management’s RADAR.

First, you need to look to MINIMIZE the following: Read the rest of this entry »

Leave a comment

5 Quick Steps to Strategically Map Workplace Learning

This is the first of a series of “Quick Steps” that will empower learning professionals to align with their management’s and organizational expectations for training and e-learning. So, please keep coming back to read the next “Quick Steps” in upcoming blogs.

Many learning professionals believe business and strategic concepts are complicated. Let me share a secret with you…it isn’t. Senior management likes to keep things simple but recognize that they must quickly adapt to market and economic changes.

Senior management realizes that competitiveness and long-term sustainability comes through employees that are adaptable and possess relevant job skills. They also recognize that workplace learning is an essential element to making this happen. This is why workplace learning has an opportunity to play a prominent role…but only if it is able to respond and align to strategic objectives. Read the rest of this entry »

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: